Free LSAT Course > Logic Games > Hybrid Games

Hybrid Games

These games are about 20% of the total games on the LSAT, so you might get one of them as one of the four games on test day. They combine the traits of Ordering Games and Grouping Games.

For example: Imagine that seven people need to give speeches at the council meeting.

  • If Barbara needs to give her speech after Charles gives his, but before Miriam gives hers, what is the fewest number of people that must follow Barbara?

This video segues you from Linear Games to Hybrid Games.

Intro (0:01) | Ex.1 (1:25) | Ex.2 (13:52) | Ex.3 (15:12) | Summary (15:56)

Hybrid Logic Games Video Walkthrough

0:30 – 12% of logic games are mixed games, and 8% of all games are hybrid games.

0:53 – A hybrid game is a game that combines grouping and ordering tasks.

1:03 – Rules in a hybrid game: Fixed Position, Relative Relationship, Fixed Relationship, and Conditional Relationship.

1:22 – The first step is to create a game board.

1:25 – For example: The three highest-placing teams in a high school debate tournament are the teams from Fairview, Gillom, and Hilltop high schools. (F, G, H)

Each team has exactly two members. The individuals on these three teams are Mei, Navarro, O’Rourke, Pavlovich, Sethna, and Tsudama. (M, N, O, P, S, T)

2:30 – The second step is to notate the rules.

2:40 – The given rules are:

  • Sethna is on the team from Gillom High. (SG)
  • Tsudama is on the second-place team. (T2)
  • Mei and Pavlovich are not on the same team. (~(M and P))
  • Pavlovich’s team places higher than Navarro’s team. (P – N)
  • The team from Gillom high places higher than the team from Hilltop High. (G – H)

3:33 – The next step is to think about any inferences given the information.

3:46 – One strategy is to see if there are any floaters (players not involved in the rules). (O)

4:04 – If G were the 2nd place team, H would have to be the 3rd team given the 5th rule.

4:33 – Similarly, if G were to go 1st, H could go 3rd or 2nd.

4:40 – Next, create three game boards where we map out the placement of the teams based on the given.

6:25 – We would now be able to more easily answer the questions once we have all the information and inferences mapped out.

Which one of the following could be an accurate list of the members of each of the three highest-placing teams?

  • (A) first place: Mei and O’Rourke; second place: Pavlovich and Sethna; third place: Navarro and O’Rourke
  • (B) first place: Mei and Pavlovich; second place: Sethna and Tsudama; third place: Navarro and O’Rourke
  • (C) first place: Navarro and Sethna; second place: Pavlovich and Tsudama; third place: Mei and O’Rourke
  • (D) first place: O’Rourke and Pavlovich; second place: Navarro and Tsudama; third place: Mei and Sethna
  • (E) first place: Pavlovich and Sethna; second place: O’Rourke and Tsudama; third place: Mei and Navarro

6:38 – We just have to apply the rules to remove the wrong choices and find the right answer.

7:00 – If we take the 2nd rule, we can rule rid of (A) because we know T is on the second-place team.

7:12 – The 3rd rule states that M and P can’t be on the same team, so we can rid of choice (B).

7:21 – The 4th rule tells us that P is before N. Therefore, we can rid of choice (C) which tells us the opposite.

7:32 – The last rule tells us that G is before H. This means that the team from G cannot be the last team. Since S must be on a team from G, then S cannot be third. Therefore, we can get rid of (D).

8:11 – This leaves us with (E) as the answer.

Next Question (Starts at 8:20)

8:20 – Now consider this question given new information: If Pavlovich is on the team from Hilltop High, then which one of the following could be true?

  • (A) O’Rourke is on the first-place team.
  • (B) Pavlovich is on the first-place team.
  • (C) Mei is on the second-place team.
  • (D) Navarro is on the second-place team.
  • (E) Sethna is on the second-place team.

10:43 – By using the same method before, we can get rid of the wrong answers and come up with the right answer, which is (A).

Global Question (Starts at 10:47)

10:47 – Let us a take a look at this global question: Sethna’s teammate could be any one of the following except:

  • (A) Mei
  • (B) Navarro
  • (C) O’Rourke
  • (D) Pavlovich
  • (E) Tsudama

12:50 – Following the same procedure, we’ll be able to come up with (B) as the answer.

12:58 – Some hybrid games are closed (the number of players in each team is given) and some are open (the number of players in each team is not given).

13:15 – Let’s take another example: A radio DJ will select songs from among seven—F, G, H, J, K, L, and M—to play during her show. This is an open hybrid question.

13:23 – If we were to change the question so select exactly 4 songs from among seven, then we have a closed hybrid question.

14:00 – Another feature we sometimes have to deal with are games that involve subgroups.

15:03 – Finally, we have forming frames, which occurs in 39% of hybrid games, is a powerful tool for answering questions faster.

15:18 – The idea of a partial tree is when a player is limited to a couple of places, then you could use that to form a couple of frames. Using inferences from the rules, you can then answer the question more quickly.

15:45 – You can also use blocks to answer this type of question.

Summary (Starts at 15:56)

15:56 – Summary:

  • First, create a game board.
  • Next, notate the rules.
  • Then make any inferences and potentially look for frames.
  • Finally, use what you gathered to answer the questions.

16:14 – You spot a hybrid game if a question is asking you both a grouping task and an ordering task.

16:19 – You generally use a column chart for the teams and slots for the ordering. For the rules, keep in mind fixed position, relative relationship, fixed relationship, and conditional relationship.

16:34 – You can create frames via blocks and partial trees.

Next LSAT: July 11th

Advanced Inferences

Inferences from but not both statements.

This is a long and challenging video, but it shows how many inferences can be drawn from seemingly short and simple statements. Watch it closely and follow it step-by-step.

Hybrid Walkthrough #1

By the end of the video you should have a Set Up prepared to answer the below questions:

Video Quiz

Hybrid Games

Best viewed in landscape mode

5 questions with video explanations

100 seconds per question

Continue to Question (1)

Time Expired

Replay Video

Replay Video

Are you sure you want to refresh the question?

Instructions

Choose the correct answer.

Press SELECT to start video.

Be sure to turn on your volume to hear the explanation.

Hybrid Walkthrough #2

By the end of the video you should have a Set Up prepared to answer the below questions:

Video Quiz

Hybrid Games

Best viewed in landscape mode

6 questions with video explanations

100 seconds per question

Continue to Question (1)

Time Expired

Replay Video

Replay Video

Are you sure you want to refresh the question?

Instructions

Choose the correct answer.

Press SELECT to start video.

Be sure to turn on your volume to hear the explanation.

This chapter’s lessons are complete. You can choose to continue to the next lesson (it involves rare LSAT game types). However, most students should move on to the chapter review questions.

  • Site-sponsor LSATLab offers a free demo Logic Games online classes on a regular basis:

Next LSAT: July 11th